Best Practices in Educational Facilities Investments

Strategic investment (312)

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Building Bulletin 93: Acoustic Design of Schools

Updated in 2014. Sets out minimum performance standards for the acoustics of school buildings, and describes the normal means of demonstrating compliance with the Building Regulations. It also provides guidance in support of the School Premises Regulations (2012) and the Independent School Standards (2013). Mandatory.
Categories: Legislation and regulations and standards, Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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Building Bulletin 101: Ventilation of School Buildings

Provides the regulatory framework in support of the Building Regulations for the adequate provision of ventilation in schools. It deals with the design of school buildings to meet the ventilation requirements of both The School Premises Regulations and the Building Regulations Part F (Ventilation).
Categories: Legislation and regulations and standards, Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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Building Bulletin 90: Lighting design for schools

Contains general lighting design advice suitable for architects and clients. Not mandatory.
Categories: Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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EFA Daylight design guide

Aims to help school lighting designers involved in the design of new schools understand climate based daylight modelling. Not mandatory.
Categories: Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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Building Bulletin 100: Design for Fire safety in schools

Guidance provides fire safety design guidance for schools in England and Wales. The guidance applies to nursery schools, primary and secondary schools, including sixth form colleges, academies and city technology colleges, special schools and pupil referral units. It is the normal means of compliance with building regulations for fire safety design in new school buildings.
Categories: Legislation and regulations and standards, Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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Schools for the future: designing school grounds

The document, ‘Schools for the future: designing school grounds’, contains information, guidance and ideas to inspire the designs for school grounds. The guide also includes examples of schools that have used the development of their grounds to enhance the educational, recreational and social needs of their pupils. Not mandatory.
Categories: Design guidelines
Country: UK-England
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The impact of classroom design on pupils' learning: Final results of a holistic, multi-level analysis

This study identifies the impact of the physical classroom features on the academic progress of pupils. It confirms the utility of the naturalness, individuality and stimulation (or more memorably, SIN) conceptual model as a vehicle to organise and study the full range of sensory impacts experienced by an individual occupying a given space. In this particular case the naturalness design principle accounts for around 50% of the impact on learning, with the other two accounting for roughly a quarter each. Within this structure, seven key design parameters have been identified that together explain 16% of the variation in pupils' academic progress achieved. These are Light, Temperature, Air Quality, Ownership, Flexibility, Complexity and Colour. The muted impact of the whole-building level of analysis provides some support for the importance of “inside-out design”. The identification of the impact of the built environment factors on learning progress is a major new finding for schools' research, but also suggests that the scale of the impact of building design on human performance and wellbeing in general, can be isolated and that it is non-trivial. It is argued that it makes sense to capitalise on this promising progress and to further develop these concepts and techniques.
Categories: Evaluation and assessment of design quality and learning outcomes
Country: United Kingdom
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Clever Classrooms - Summary report of the HEAD project (Holistic Evidence and Design)

Based on the results of the HEAD Project (Holistic Evidence and Design), funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, clear evidence has been found that well-designed primary schools boost children’s academic performance in reading, writing and maths. Differences in the physical characteristics of classrooms explain 16% of the variation in learning progress over a year for the 3766 pupils included in the study. Or to make this more tangible, it is estimated that the impact of moving an ‘average’ child from the least effective to the most effective space would be around 1.3 sub-levels, a big impact when pupils typically make 2 sub-levels progress a year.
Categories: Evaluation and assessment of design quality and learning outcomes
Country: United Kingdom
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South African Schools Act 84 of 1996. National Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for School Infrastructure

The norms and standards presented in this document are underpinned by the above referred National Policy for Equitable Provision of an Enabling School Physical Teaching and Learning Environment. The policy comprises 6 strategic and 2 operational policy statements. The first of the 6 strategic policy statements calls for the development of norms and standards for equitable provision of an enabling physical teaching and learning environment as an urgent priority. The national policy further states that national norms and standards would be developed during 2008, fully adopted by the end of 2009, and implemented by 2010. Thus, this document serves as the first step towards the operationalization of the national policy. As national instruments, these norms and standards will apply to ALL public ordinary schools (excluding hostels) that operate in South Africa, regardless of the ownership.
Categories: Legislation and regulations and standards, Funding guidelines for schools, Design guidelines
Country: South Africa
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Guidelines for Human Settlement Planning and Design

This document provides guidance on appropriate practices and technologies. Emphasis isplaced on assessing “performance” (in relation to issues like health, safety, recreation, education and trade) as opposed to simply assessing the quantitative dimensions of the plan to ensure some form of compliance with stated norms. Various national and provincial government departments, statutory bodies and local authorities may also have their own sets of guidelines for use by planners and engineers. It is not the intention of this document to take the place of these other guidelines. Rather, the Red Book should be considered as being supplementary to them, because local conditions and experiences can often dictate what procedure should be followed in specific cases.
Categories: Strategic planning, Design guidelines, Construction and cost management
Country: South Africa